Supporters of Zaza Saralidze in front of the parliament, September 18, 2018. Photo by  Inna Kukudzhanova for the Caucasian Knot

25 September 2018, 14:15

Saralidze asks Mayoralty to allow setting up tents at Georgian Parliament

Zaza Saralidze, the father of the murdered schoolboy, has applied to Tbilisi Mayoralty for an official permit to install tents in front of the parliament building in order to keep holding protests regardless of weather.

The "Caucasian Knot" has reported that on September 18, after meeting Elias II, the Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia, Zaza Saralidze, the initiator of the "Don't Kill" campaign, stopped his hunger strike he held in front of the Georgian Parliament since September 10. In the course of his protest, he twice needed doctors' help. Despite the termination of his hunger strike, Saralidze continued the protest with some of his supporters.

Protests related to the murder of two schoolchildren, including the Zaza Saralidze's son, began in Tbilisi on May 31.

Zaza Saralidze appealed to Tbilisi Mayoralty on September 24. "I demanded an extension of protests and a permit to install tents ... I asked the Mayoralty to allow setting up at least two tents because of bad weather. We, who continue our protest, are in a very bad situation – in cold and under rain," Mr Saralidze said on air of the Georgian "Rustavi-2" TV Company.

According to his story, the law allows setting up tents without any official Mayoralty's permit; however, he decided to ask for it. According to the Georgian legislation, the Mayoralty has 10 days to give an answer.

This article was originally published on the Russian page of 24/7 Internet agency ‘Caucasian Knot’ on September 25, 2018 at 01:02 am MSK. To access the full text of the article, click here.

Author: Inna Kukudzhanova; Source: CK correspondent

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